Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013 at ICP

//Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013 at ICP

Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013

 

On view from
May 16, 2014 through September 7, 2014
Internacional Center of Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Paolo Gasparini’s “This Sky We See Here” (1972).CreditPaolo Gasparini, Collection Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski

 

Venezuelan Artists:

Alfredo Boulton

Paolo Gasparini

Alexander Apostól

Daniel González

Barbara Brändli

Vladimir Sersa

Jorge Vall

Julio Vengoechera

Roberto Fontana

Ricardo Armas

Carlos German Rojas

Luis Molina Pantin

Salvador Valero

Ricardo Jimenez

 

From May 16 through September 7, 2014, the International Center of Photography (ICP) presents Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013, a major survey of photographic movements in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela.

Urbes Mutantes (Mutant Cities) takes the dynamic and occasionally chaotic Latin American city as its focus. Spanning seven decades, but focused particularly on works produced from the 1950s to the 1980s, the exhibition offers a revision of how the continent’s cities have been imagined. The exhibition draws primarily on street photography and depictions of public space during periods of political and social upheaval. It is organized into sections that explore the street as a platform for protest, the formation of urban identities, popular street culture, and the public face of poverty.

“As the 20th century progressed, amidst struggles for social justice and in defense of democracy and freedom, the city became a setting for uprisings and revolutions,” says Guest Curator Alexis Fabry. “Images became as important as the stories covering the events that shaped these Latin American nations. In certain cases, politics and art were inseparable.”

Without attempting to provide an exhaustive account of Latin America’s photographic traditions, the exhibition spotlights alternative views of the region’s urban centers, bringing greater nuance to stock clichés or rigidly framed generic stereotypes. One of the challenges posed by this exhibition is to reveal how politically and socially committed visions can be paired with other types of urban documentation. These include formal experiments, such as abstract renderings of architecture and urbanization, or the more ironic and cynical works that emerged in the 1990s, which sought to question the region’s immutable truths and entrenched myths.

Rejecting arbitrary distinctions between genres of photography—art photography, photojournalism, documentary—Urbes Mutantes highlights the depth, richness, and diversity of the region’s extensive photographic history.

Comprising more than 200 images, the exhibition is drawn from the collection of Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski, one of the most extensive private archives of Latin American photography. Urbes Mutantes was first shown at the Museo de Arte del Banco de la República in Bogotá in 2013 and was co-curated with María Wills.

Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944–2013 is supported by Quilvest, the ICP Exhibitions Committee, Artworkers Retirement Society, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

 

Alumni Perspectives

May 23–August 22 | Fridays | 6:00 pm

Join ICP alumni for conversations about the exhibition Urbes Mutantes: Latin American Photography 1944– 2013. Spanning decades marked by enormous artistic and political upheaval across Latin America, the exhibition focuses on the city, particularly as seen through street photography. Every Friday at 6:00 pm, ICP alumni lead discussions in the exhibition while sharing their personal perspectives as Latin American photographers.

For more information visit ICP International Center of Photography 

 

2018-03-15T00:51:53+00:00

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.